Sound studies / Studies of sound

Earlier this year I came across the work of Steven Feld, a pioneer in sound-based cultural anthropology, and was delighted to find on his website a remark about “sound studies.”

I hate “sound studies”!

I love studies of sound; that’s not the issue. I hate the conglomeration phrase “sound studies” because…

“Sound studies” totalizes the object “sound,” and it presumes an imagined coherence to that object that one is supposed to know in advance.

[From Steven Feld, I Hate “Sound Studies” ]

I couldn’t agree more with his point.
In a similar vein, think about “Japanese culture” and “the culture of Japan.”
The former presumes a pre-defined set of authentically “Japanese” behaviors, while the latter evokes an openness and a willingness to accept the reality of how people in Japan are actually behaving. I like to think those unconscious actions and customs in everyday life make up the actual “culture” of a country. But they are hard to measure.
Sadly, I sense that the kind of nationalism and aikokushin (love for one’s country) the government is trying to instill in children through school education is based on the former. It tries to teach a “Japanese culture” that ordinary citizens have long lost touch with.
This deprives children of the opportunity to see the powerful but hidden connections between themselves and their culture– in other words, to have ownership of their values and the empowerment to change that culture if need be.
To see it from the other side, if we just added a no (“of”) to the curriculum title, it might unleash so much more flexibility in the way we think about culture.

What words can do, what images can do [2]

先日イベントでお会いした画家・絵本作家の舘野鴻(たての・ひろし)さんの絵本『宮沢賢治の鳥』が素晴らしかった。

どのページもまるで仲間の鳥たちの目線で描いたような細密な描写と臨場感。羽根の中の筋まで一本ずつ丁寧に描かれていながら、図鑑のような感じが全くしないのは迫力ある構図のせいだろうか(もともと図鑑の生物画や解剖図なども手がけられていたのだそう)。その絵に、宮沢賢治の書いた言葉がそっと添えてある。巻末には国松俊英氏による解説があって、それぞれの鳥の生態がわかるようになっている。

私がブックデザインをしているという話から、絵を生かす絵本のデザインについて話してくれた舘野さん。『宮沢賢治の鳥』でも、まずは絵を感じてほしい、だから上に余計な言葉は乗せたくなかった、とのこと。何の鳥が何をしているのか、というのはここでは二次的な情報であり、絵と同居させる必要はない。そこのところを間違ってしまうデザイナーがいるとがっかりするのだそう。

舘野さんの絵を見て、本当に言葉は要らないなと思った。

説明を通して理解するのではなく、絵を好きなようにじっくりと眺めて、感覚で理解する。しばし鳥たちの目線でその世界に入ってみる。そうやって、時間はかかっても自分なりに何かを感じたり考えたりする過程があって初めて、愛着や敬意や、英語で言うownershipといったものが生まれてくるんだと思う。それはつまり自分の中に隠れていたものとの対話の過程だから。何でもネットで調べてわかったつもりになってしまいがちな時代に、その内側からの「気付き」の経験こそが貴重になる気がしている。それは誰にも真似することができないし、奪うこともできない。舘野さんの絵はそんな対話を受け止められるだけの深い懐を持っていて、その絵本のページは、絵と向き合う大事な空間なのだ。

絵本の装丁の機会はまだないけれど、絵本に限らず、言葉と絵(イメージ)のそれぞれにできることは何か、その力を最大限引き出すにはどうしたらいいか、思わぬ方向から大きなヒントをもらった気がする。

What words can do, what images can do [1]

絵とことばの関係について。

実は、ことばを通してしか、新しい情報を伝えられないのではないか。

絵と言葉の優劣の問題ではなく、それぞれの性質の問題として、ふとそう思うことがあった。

絵や写真(非言語のもの、イメージ)を見るとき、純粋にそれだけを提示されることは実は少ない。タイトルや解説など、何かしらの「ことば」がそばにある。見る側も、イメージを解釈する手がかりとして言葉を探してしまうものだ。

逆にイメージだけと向き合うとき、私は自分の中に既にあるもの、つまり自分の経験や知識からしか判断できない。自分の器が試されるというか。

何かを見て湧く感情、興味、気付きというのはすべて、自分の中にあったものを参照した結果で、それが表面化したり意識されたりしたもの。そうして自ら何かを発見した(ように感じる)からこそ、心に残る。いわば思考の「内への拡張」。

一方、言葉があると、私の中にはなかった全く新しい情報が入ってくる。例えばその絵のタイトルや、それが生まれた背景や文脈といった情報を受け取ることで、新たな次元で絵を見ることができる。これは「外への拡張」だろうか。

そうして経験した一連のことが蓄積して、また別の絵を見たときの参照先になる。

そして考えてみれば、これは美術館で絵を見るときに限ったことではなくて、現実も自分の眼前の「絵」だ。現実にはキャプションもタイトルも(自分の中にあるもの以外)ない。誰かと話したり、何か文字を読んだりして言葉と遭遇しない限り。

という仮説をぼんやりと立てていたら、画家の安野光雅さんも、シリーズ『旅の絵本』の巻末にそんなことを書いていた。目の前に広がる景色はすべて絵なのだ、というようなこと。安野さんの文には、その景色というか現地の諸々に介入できない旅人の宿命に対する、僅かな後ろめたさも込められているように感じたけれど。

あと、言葉が文字という形で与えられる場合、それは言葉であると同時にイメージだが、that’s another story…

どちらかというと言葉の側からそんなことを考えていたのだが、最近それをイメージの側から見させてくれる出会いがあった。[つづく]

Dan Flavin’s tubes aren’t going to last forever

I fell in love with Dan Flavin‘’s work back in 2013, during my first stay in London. The Tate Modern had a room dedicated to him at the time.

初めてロンドンに滞在した2013年にダン・フレイヴィンの作品を知り、一目で惹かれた。当時はテート・モダンにフレイヴィン作品を集めた部屋があった。

How could something make you feel so serene, meditative, peaceful–something that’s made of fluorescent tubes? Is there something about light that makes things look ethereal? I even remember sketching the works to see if there were any patterns. But they were all just a few types of ordinary fluorescent tubes put together. But they were beautiful.

蛍光灯がこんなに静謐な空間を作ってしまうのはどういうことなのか。光にはそういう力があるのかなと思ったり(安藤忠雄の光の教会のように)。とにかく不思議と居心地の良い空間だった。

Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo, 2017
“Monument” for V. Tatlin (1964-65) at Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo, 2017
Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo, 2017
Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo, 2017

Fast forward to 2017 and Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo did a Dan Flavin show. And I had a question. What happens when the tubes expire someday?

2017年、エスパス ルイ・ヴィトン東京のダン・フレイヴィン展で、この蛍光灯が切れたらどうなるのか聞いてみた。

I asked a staff member there, who told me that in fact, yes, they will expire someday in the future. According to what he’d heard, people who purchased the work received a couple of spare tubes, which I guess was part of the idea because they were mundane objects at the time. Now, ironically, those tubes are becoming harder to find. So a body of work that most likely raised questions about mass production is now something akin to a candle. It is literally burning away its finite resources, as long as it is being exhibited.

スタッフによれば、蛍光灯が切れたときのために、購入者には予備が数本渡されたのだそう。けれど今、当時はどこにでもあった同型の蛍光灯が次第にどこにもなくなってしまった。大量生産品を使ったという点でも面白かったはずの作品が、今はろうそくのように有限の命を燃やしながら展示されているのだ。

And so the works now possess a unique quality of being static, yet finite. Unlike traditional paintings and sculptures. I found this to be an interesting example of how context changes the meaning of things.

Flavin probably didn’t plan this…or did he?

静的だけれど有限という、絵画とも一般的な彫刻とも違う性質を持つことになった作品。時代や文脈によって物の意味って変わるんだということを目の当たりにした気がした。

フレイヴィン自身も予想してなかったのではないだろうか。それともそうやって「デザイン」された作品だったのかな、、?